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Archive for March, 2006

And this means more non-English speaking people coming online with a lot of thirst for indian language content.

Microsoft, Reliance Infocomm and kiosk agencies such as Drishtee have reportedly chalked out plans to set up PC kiosks in Indian villages.

The government has also planned to set up 100,000 kiosks in the country’s villages by December 2007.If all goes as planned, more than 40 per cent of India’s countryside will be logged on to the Web by ‘07-end, reports Economic Times.

At present, there are around 10,000 internet kiosks in rural India, most of which consist of ITC’s e-Choupals.

Meanwhile, Intel has announced its Jagruti initiative in a bid to support the spread of rural internet kiosks based on the new Intel-Powered Community PCs. These PCs would be available through Intel partners HCL and Wipro.

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“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.”

– Henry David Thoreau, Walden

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Hindi (हिन्दी hindī), an Indo-European language spoken mainly in North, Central, and West India, is one of the national languages of India. It is part of a dialect continuum of the Indo-Aryan family, bounded on the northwest and west by Panjābī, Sindhī, and Gujarātī; on the south by Marāthī; on the southeast by Orīyā; on the east by Bengālī; and on the north by Nepālī. Seeing the popularity of Hindi, BBC World Service started News in Hindi in 1940.

There are 480 million native hindi speakers in the world today.

Hindi also refers to a standardized register of Hindustani that was made one of the official languages of India. The grammatical description in this article concerns this standard Hindi.

Hindi is often contrasted with Urdū, another standardized form of Hindustani that is the official language of Pakistan and some states in India. The primary differences between the two are that Standard Hindi is written in Devanāgarī and has supplemented some of its Persian and Arabic vocabulary with words from Sanskrit, while Urdu is written in Nastaliq script, a variant of the Persio-Arabic script, and draws heavily on Persian and Arabic vocabulary. The term “Urdu” also includes dialects of Hindustani other than the standardized languages. Other than these, linguists consider Hindi and Urdu to be the same language.

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“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.”

– Henry David Thoreau, Walden

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“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.”

– Henry David Thoreau, Walden

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India’s Enthusiasm

“If you want to know what India feels like today, it’s very simple. Pull out a champagne bottle, shake it for an hour, and take the cork off. You don’t want to get in the way of that cork.”

– Tom Friedman

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“In the annals of computer comedy, one of the most famous anecdotes is about asking a speech recognition engine, “Recognize speech?” The translation comes back: “Wreck a nice beach.””

Scaling the Language Barrier

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